Quality Fermentation On Tap at ACC

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Quality Fermentation On Tap at ACC

Though brewing is a male-populated field, which Prof Blatecky hopes to see change, ancient Egyptian females serve up a fine batch of suds in this image.

Though brewing is a male-populated field, which Prof Blatecky hopes to see change, ancient Egyptian females serve up a fine batch of suds in this image.

Though brewing is a male-populated field, which Prof Blatecky hopes to see change, ancient Egyptian females serve up a fine batch of suds in this image.

Though brewing is a male-populated field, which Prof Blatecky hopes to see change, ancient Egyptian females serve up a fine batch of suds in this image.

Good things are brewing in the Fermentation Sciences program run by Biology faculty member Jessica Blatecky at Arapahoe Community College. While the program is still in its infantile stage, there has already been significant growth in the past year.

When the local brewery Oskar Blues saw the need for greater education amongst its employees, they turned to Front Range Community College for help. After its success in Fort Collins, the program was brought to ACC and thus, the Fermentation Sciences program was born, giving homebrewers a place to better their craft. . . and so much more.

The program also serves as a starting point for those looking to eventually graduate from a four-year university with a BS degree in Fermentation Sciences and Technology. While most students are on a mission to make beer, there are a select few who have other agendas within the food fermentation aspects of the program.

 

ACC has partnered with Breckenridge Brewery, just down Santa Fe Drive from the Main campus, for its Fermentation degree.

As with all new things, there is always a learning curve.  Blatecky has had to face several obstacles in the implementation of the program. As it stands, there is a lack of food fermentation textbooks, making it near impossible to develop curriculum around the newly growing market of kombucha, yogurt, cheeses, and even sausage and chocolate.

It is in Blatecky’s future plans to introduce a one-credit internship to the program, to give students more hands on training, as well as offer more general education classes for the public.

Celebrating nine students currently enrolled, the program welcomes newcomers with open arms, and encourages students not to be intimidated by the science aspect that tends to scare people away.

It is for this exact reason that Blatecky set the program up with no prerequisites, so even the curious can dip their toes in the water. She even noted that she starts her Craft Beer Brewing course off with a crash course in chemistry and biology for those who do not have a science background.

Blatecky spoke about the gender gap that has historically existed within the industry, and how much evolution has occurred since she first started. She reminisced about taking her brewing exam not long ago, where she was the only woman amongst seven other bearded men.

Professor Blatecky, founder of the Fermentation Program.

Blatecky commented, “It’s silly that there is a gender stereotype in the industry, like any kind of gender stereotype, but I like the fact that the stereotype is kind of coming down a little bit. And, being a female teacher of the industry is kind of a nice thing.”

As proud member of the beer culture, Blatecky noted that it is a neat thing to be knowledgeable about and able to understand the science of what makes beer taste so good.

Keep an eye out for information on ACC’s Fermentation Sciences program, as they brew up the next best thing coming to a bar near you!

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